Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim. Agrippa’s true interest lay in the occult, and he accumulated a vast wealth of knowledge. He studied theology, astrology, medicine, and alchemy, as well as how all those subjects tied in with his theories of divine magic. In 1510, he wrote a three-volume treatise entitled Occult Philosophy and sent it to Abott Johannes Trithemius for approval. Trithemius’ response was that Agrippa should be cautious, “lest ye be trod under the oxen’s feet, as oftentimes happens.” The manuscript was not published for another two decades.

Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim. Agrippa’s true interest lay in the occult, and he accumulated a vast wealth of knowledge. He studied theology, astrology, medicine, and alchemy, as well as how all those subjects tied in with his theories of divine magic. In 1510, he wrote a three-volume treatise entitled Occult Philosophy and sent it to Abott Johannes Trithemius for approval. Trithemius’ response was that Agrippa should be cautious, “lest ye be trod under the oxen’s feet, as oftentimes happens.” The manuscript was not published for another two decades.

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